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Articles in Category: By Device

An Overview of Microsoft Surface Tablets

Sunday, 03 March 2013

There are two models of the Surface tablets, one with a low-energy processor featuring Windows RT, and another with an Intel processor featuring Windows 8 Pro.

An Overview of Microsoft Surface Tablets

There are two models of the Surface tablets, one with a low-energy processor featuring Windows RT, and another with an Intel processor featuring Windows 8 Pro.

Google Chrome for iPad and iPhone is serious Safari competition

Wednesday, 20 February 2013

Google Chrome is available for iOS and it is a great alternative to Safari on iPad.

Google Chrome for iPad and iPhone is serious Safari competition

Google Chrome is available for iOS and it is a great alternative to Safari. I spent some time reviewing Chrome on the iOS and here is what I discovered. It is worth downloading and it is becoming my preferred browser for my iPhone and iPad.

Why Microsoft will be successful transitioning it's business model from the desktop to mobile

Thursday, 14 February 2013

Microsoft has to convert it's core business from generating revenue from high cost operating system upgrades and large desktop software suites to revenue growth from mobile apps, digital media, and tablet technology.

Why Microsoft will be successful transitioning it's business model from the desktop to mobile

Microsoft is caught in an interesting business dilemma. Microsoft has to convert it's core business from generating revenue from high cost operating system upgrades and large desktop software suites to revenue growth from mobile apps, digital media, and tablet technology.

iOS leads Android in Enterprise Mobile App Development with Windows 8 Quickly Gaining Momentum

Friday, 25 January 2013

Apple's iOS took a dramatic lead over Google's Android in the enterprise app space based on survey results from Appcelerator.

iOS leads Android in Enterprise Mobile App Development with Windows 8 Quickly Gaining Momentum

Appcelerator completed a survey of more than 3,500 developers from around the world in Q2 2012. The findings reveal that developers are:

  1. Focused on creating mobile applications for the enterprise with Apple poised to take the lead.
  2. Developers are interested in Microsoft's Windows 8 platform.
  3. Cloud services will play a big role in developing mobile apps moving forward.

A head-to-head comparison of 7 inch tablets

Thursday, 17 January 2013

We take a look at three solid 7 inch tablet competitive products from Apple, Amazon, and Google

A head-to-head comparison of 7 inch tablets

The 7 inch tablet market is not a one-size-fits-all landscape. The Nexus 7, Kindle Fire HD, and iPad mini target different audiences. The Nexus 7 attracts gamers and multimedia enthusiasts with an Android bias. The Kindle Fire HD is aimed squarely at Amazon members looking to maximize their Amazon subscriptions at an affordable price with a nice display.

The Security Advantage of BlackBerry Devices Is Fading

Monday, 14 January 2013

The competition is getting closer to eliminating the security advantage of RIM devices.

The Security Advantage of BlackBerry Devices Is Fading

The competition is getting closer to eliminating the security advantage of RIM devices. iOS and Android devices are becoming more secure, and may in fact be reaching BlackBerry's levels of security. RIM also has Microsoft tablets and smartphones to contend with. Microsoft has a loyal corporate following with tight security inside all their devices.

Retina display for the iPad mini rumoured in the latter half of 2013

Sunday, 18 November 2012

A rumour from the Asia supply chain indicates there will be a future Retina version of the 7.9-inch iPad mini tablet.

Retina display for the iPad mini rumoured in the latter half of 2013

A rumour from the Asia supply chain indicates there will be a future Retina version of the 7.9-inch iPad mini tablet. This is according to Chinese-language DoNews (November 7). AUO manufactures the iPad mini display and they are apparently working on a 2,048x1,536 pixel resolution display for the next iPad mini.

The 2,048x1,536 pixel resolution is the sane resolution as the the 9.7-inch Retina display on the third- and fourth-generation iPads. Because the iPad mini has a smaller display (7.9-inches as coma red to 9.7-inches) this translates into a 300-plus pixel density (versus the iPad 4's 264 pixels per inch). Display manufacturer AUO has to pack the same number of pixels into a 7.9-inch display.

None of this should come as a big surprise because the non-Retina iPad mini is sandwiched between three Apple Retina products -- the 4-inch iPhone 5, 9.7-inch iPad, and the MacBook Pro Retina models. It is very natural for Apple to begin working on a retina iPad mini.

When the iPad mini launched, one of the most consistent criticisms was its grainy 163 pixels-per-inch display. Apple must address this shortcoming and ensure that there are retina versions of all their mobile devices.

The retina-class display aimed at the iPad mini is not likely to appear until the latter half of 2013.

Microsoft's Modern-UI, Metro, Windows 8-style, Windows Store Apps- What the heck do we call them?

Wednesday, 07 November 2012

If Microsoft remains confused about what to call the new interface, imagine how users feel.

Microsoft's Modern-UI, Metro, Windows 8-style, Windows Store Apps- What the heck do we call them?

Will Tschumy at Microsoft's BUILD developer's conference, a principal user experience advisor for Microsoft, said that the term "Windows 8 Store app" is now Microsoft's preferred name for apps that are written specifically to run on Windows 8.

Microsoft officially named apps in the Windows 8 App Store to "Windows 8 Store apps". So that's that!

Well I would argue it isn't really the end of the discussion. The issue is that the word "app" is owned by Apple and Google with respect to mind share. In the end the name will always be boiled down to an "app". Users will just see them as "apps" and call them "apps" no matter where they come from or what platform they run on.

No matter what Microsoft calls them, users will just end up calling them "apps". The story gets more confusing because there are two types of Surface tablets:

  1. One that runs Windows RT and is built for the ARM architecture and only run "Windows 8 Store apps".
  2. One that runs Windows 8 and is built for the x86 Intel architecture and runs  "Windows 8 Store apps" and classic Windows applications for Intel processors.

Are apps "Windows 8 Store apps" and classic Windows applications or are they just "Windows 8 Store apps"? It gets really confusing. I don't know what to call classic Windows applications built for the the x86 Intel architecture. Help me Microsoft?

Add to the confusion that the UI for the Surface tablet was called Metro but there was a trademark dispute with a German company and the "Metro" name had to be dropped by Microsoft. People were calling the apps for the new Surface UI "Metro apps". A nice neat and simple name.

Other names that have been used to describe apps written specifically for Windows 8 include "Modern," "Modern UI-style" and "Windows 8-style" apps.

Even though Microsoft says the correct name is "Windows 8 Store apps", Microsoft employees are referring to them as "Windows store app" during presentations.

The name "Windows 8 Store apps" is long, hard to say, and does not lend itself to general usage. Users will almost certainly ignore all this marketing confusion and simply use the the word "app". So maybe none of it really matters.

Repeat after me:
"Windows 8 Store apps", "Windows 8 Store apps", "Windows 8 Store apps", "Windows 8 Store apps".

I give up. I will just call them "apps" or if I really have to, "Windows apps".

The problem goes deeper than totally confusing nomenclature. This goes to the core of the problem of having a single operating system with two separate interfaces.

  1. Windows 8 UI (formerly Metro)- I am not sure what Microsoft want's me to call this so I created my own name.
  2. Classic Windows UI (formerly known as Windows 7)- I am not sure what Microsoft want's me to call this so I created my own name.

On the Windows store Microsoft uses the term "apps from Windows 8". This is not the official name "Windows 8 Store apps".
 
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-CA/windows-8/apps

If Microsoft remains confused about what to call the new interface, imagine how users feel.


Official NamePrevious NamesDescriptionWhat Users Will Likely Use
Windows 8 Store apps
  • Metro apps
  • Modern apps
  • Modern UI-style apps
  • Windows 8-style apps
  • Windows store app

Apps that compatible with Windows RT and run on the ARM architecture.

Apps that run on Windows 8 are and built specifically for Window 8.

"Windows 8 Store apps"

  • "Apps"
  • "Windows Apps"
No Official Name
  • Application
  • Windows Application
  • Desktop Application
Applications that runs on Windows 8 and are built for the x86 Intel architecture.
  • "Applications"
  • "Windows Applications"
  • "Classic Windows Application"